Tuesday, October 19, 2004


PythonCard 0.8.1

PythonCard is a GUI construction kit for building cross-platform desktop applications on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. The latest release of PythonCard includes over 50 sample applications and tools to help users edit and build applications in Python, plus many useful programs like the slideshow sample that you might want to use without ever bothering to do any coding. Check out the sample pages for screenshots and info about the samples. The more applications page has some info and screenshots on applications users have built with PythonCard.

New samples include floatCanvasTest, flock, gravity, testNotebook, and testSplitter. There is a new version of the codeEditor that uses tabs and will eventually replace the existing codeEditor. There is also an experimental reStructuredText and HTML editor in the codeEditor directory called restEditor.

PythonCard requires Python 2.3 or higher and wxPython 2.5.2.8 or higher.

The documentation page has links to installation instructions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows that covers installing Python, wxPython, and PythonCard. The Linux instructions will be updated soon, but we're waiting for the RPMs to be built, so for now Linux users can just download and install from the tar.gz source archive. The documentation includes some walkthroughs, screenshots and info on using PythonCard and some of its tools such as the codeEditor, resourceEditor (layout tool), findfiles, and runtime shell.

There are many changes from the earlier PythonCardPrototype packages. See the migration_guide.txt file if you are upgrading from an earlier release. Check the changelog for a complete list of changes for release 0.8.1.

If you would like to contribute to PythonCard, the first step is joining the mailing list.


2:17:09 PM    comment []

  Friday, October 01, 2004


PythonCard to the Rescue - a success story involving accelerometers, a microcontroller, Python, and PythonCard with screenshots and source code. I can't say I understand all the "hardware" talk since I am but a lowly software guy, but I was quite happy to read Daryl Fox's story as it shows that PythonCard is simple and easy to use and can get the job done even if you don't program graphical user interfaces (GUIs) every day. And in case you're curious, Daryl was a 2002 Flugtag Champion.


9:55:04 AM    comment []

  Thursday, September 30, 2004


PythonCard Coding Sprint

The Seattle Python Interest Group (SeaPig) is hosting a NorthwestPythonSprint in Bellevue, Washington on October 23rd and 24th. Brian Dorsey invited me up to help run a PythonCard sprint as part of the festivities. I'll be giving a presentation on PythonCard Saturday morning as well as helping people work on their own PythonCard projects, fix bugs, and make additions to the framework and tools. Which projects we tackle will depend on how many people show up and what interests them the most. Recently, I've been porting Flash animations and simulations to PythonCard, so I would be interested in doing some more of that, but I expect I will probably spend most of my time coaching other people.

The sprint is free, so if you can make it to Bellevue, I encourage you to attend and learn how to do some GUI programming. Pleae sign-up on the wiki and send me an email if you are planning to attend. See you there!

I expect to release PythonCard 0.8.1 in the next few weeks before the coding sprint.


10:54:06 AM    comment []

  Friday, August 20, 2004


How to live on the edge with wxPython and not get cut (i.e. using wxPython 2.4.x and 2.5.x simultaneously).

I used this trick during the initial wxPython 2.5.1.5 release on Windows and I'm sure it works, as long as you know that the application you want to run is consistent about its use of wxPython packages. The old wxPython package was wxPython.wx so typically you would see people using it as:

from wxPython.wx import *

or

from wxPython import wx

There was an experimental package in later 2.4.x releases called wx, so if you look in site-packages you'll see wx and wxPython directories. There was a magical set of import statements that imported all the wxPython.wx stuff and did namespace manipulation for the wx package in anticipation of the new wx package that would be adopted with wxPython 2.5.x and later.

As of wxPython 2.5.x the real package is wx and now the wxPython package does the magical imports and namespace manipulation to provide backward compatability for code that still uses the old imports form above. Newer packages designed to work with wxPython 2.5.x and later use imports of the form:

import wx

or if you still believe namespace collisions will never happen to you

from wx import *

So, what's this got to do with living in both worlds? If you have wxPython 2.4.2.4 installed, then go into your site-packages directory and rename the wx dir to wx24 and the wxPython dir to wxPython24. Now install wxPython 2.5.2.7. Rename the wxPython dir to wxPython25 and then rename the wxPython24 dir to wxPython. Voila, now you can live in both worlds. PythonCard will never import from wxPython.wx so there won't be a conflict between 2.4.2.4 and 2.5.2.7 libraries and a package like Boa will always be importing from wxPython.wx so it won't ever try and get something from the 2.5.2.7 wx package.

If you want to test this, simply rename the wx package back to wx25 and run your code that requires wxPython 2.4.x. If anything ever tries to import from wx then an exception will be thrown. Similarly, you can test that code that wants 2.5.x doesn't ever import from wxPython.wx by renaming the wxPython dir back to wxPython24.

I never tested this on Linux and the process might be more complicated if the underlying wxGTK libs don't live under the wx and wxPython dirs, but it works like a champ on Windows. If you are running Mac OS X, you simply shouldn't run wxPython 2.4.x, wxPython 2.5.2.7 on Mac OS X is so much better, so just upgrade!


8:01:57 AM    comment []

  Wednesday, August 18, 2004


PythonCard 0.8

PythonCard is a GUI construction kit for building cross-platform desktop applications on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. The latest release of PythonCard includes over 50 sample applications and tools to help users edit and build applications in Python, plus many useful programs like the slideshow sample that you might want to use without ever bothering to do any coding. Check out the sample pages for screenshots and info about the samples. The more applications page has some info and screenshots on applications users have built with PythonCard.

New samples include ataxx, lsystem, moderator, montyhall, mp3player, reversi, and twistedEchoClient. There is also an experimental reStructuredText and HTML editor in the codeEditor directory called restEditor.

PythonCard requires Python 2.3 or higher and wxPython 2.5.2.7 or higher.

The documentation page has links to installation instructions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows that covers installing Python, wxPython, and PythonCard. The Linux instructions will be updated soon, but we're waiting for the RPMs to be built, so for now Linux users can just download and install from the tar.gz source archive. The documentation includes some walkthroughs, screenshots and info on using PythonCard and some of its tools such as the codeEditor, resourceEditor (layout tool), findfiles, and runtime shell.

There are many changes from the earlier PythonCardPrototype packages. See the migration_guide.txt file if you are upgrading from an earlier release. Check the changelog for a complete list of changes for release 0.8.

This is the first release targeted at resolving issues for a 1.0 release. If all goes well, PythonCard 1.0 will be out this winter after wxPython 2.6 is released.

If you would like to contribute to PythonCard, the first step is joining the mailing list.


12:48:30 PM    comment []

  Monday, August 16, 2004


At long last, wxPython 2.5.2.7 has been released. PythonCard release 0.8, which is dependent on 2.5.2.7 will be out shortly. Head over to the wxPython site or just follow the links below. If you are a Mac OS X user you should be particularly happy. I've been using wxPython 2.5.2.x on my PowerBook as my primary Python development platform for the last few months and it definitely looks and works well enough that I don't feel cheated anymore compared to wxPython on Windows. Kudos to Stefan Csomor, Kevin Ollivier, Robin Dunn and everyone else that have whipped WXMAC into shape.

wxPython 2.5.2.7 has been released, all users of 2.5.1.5 are strongly encouraged to upgrade. Please read the Recent Changes and Migration Guide for details.

A snapshot of the new style wxPython reference docs is available here. While most of the content is not yet present, the docs are still usable, and in fact helpful since they already accurately document what classes and methods are present in wxPython and what the parameter names are.

Robin's OSCON 2004 tutorial and presentation slides are available.


10:48:34 AM    comment []

  Saturday, July 31, 2004


OSCON 2004 is over. I had a lot of fun along with the rest of the crowd; there were over 2000 attendees this year. Obviously I haven't blogged in a long time, but I'm sure other bloggers did a good job of covering events and sessions.

I'm off to the Python VanPy Workshop '04 in Vancouver, British Columbia where I'll be giving a talk on PythonCard Monday morning. The keynotes and sessions for the conference are looking good.

When I get back I expect to start posting a little more regularly. I've been working on release 0.8 of PythonCard and in particular paying attention to any issues I find on Mac OS X that need to be tweaked. I expect to make a release soon after Robin releases wxPython 2.5.2.x


9:25:37 AM    comment []

  Monday, April 12, 2004


O'Reilly Open Source Convention 2004

The OSCON 2004 site is live, so you can register; be sure to take advantage of the many discounts available. Also, don't forget to check the schedule for the Python 12 presentations and tutorials. OSCON is being held July 26 - 30 at the Portland Marriott Downtown in Portland, Oregon.

There is a plan to have sprints after the main conference is over, starting Friday afternoon and lasting through Monday morning, but the details haven't been worked out yet. If you are planning to attend OSCON and think you might be interested in doing some coding over the weekend, then you might want to hold off on finalizing your flights.


10:42:07 AM    comment []

PythonCard 0.7.3.1

This is a bug fix release to correct a problem with menus on Linux when using wxPython 2.5.1.5. See the previous announcement for release 0.7.3 for more information.


9:59:47 AM    comment []

  Monday, April 05, 2004


PythonCard 0.7.3

PythonCard is a GUI construction kit for building cross-platform desktop applications on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. The latest release of PythonCard includes over 40 sample applications and tools to help users edit and build applications in Python. Check out the sample pages for screenshots and info about the samples. The more applications page has some info and screenshots on applications users have built with PythonCard.

The documentation page has links to installation instructions for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows that covers installing Python, wxPython, and PythonCard. The documentation includes some walkthroughs, screenshots and info on using PythonCard and some of its tools such as the codeEditor, resourceEditor (layout tool), findfiles, and runtime shell.

The main point of this release is to add support for wxPython 2.5.x while still supporting wxPython 2.4.x. Check the changelog for a complete list of changes for release 0.7.3.

This is the last planned release of PythonCard as a "prototype". The status of the project on SourceForge has already been changed to beta. The current plan is for the next release to be 0.8, which will drop "Prototype" from the package name, include more documentation, and finalize some of the core APIs exposed to user code. If all goes well, there will be a PythonCard 1.0 release by early summer.

If you would like to contribute to PythonCard, the first step is joining the mailing list.


1:19:28 PM    comment []

  Sunday, April 04, 2004


Roberto Alsina's Custom widgets using PyQt is a short tutorial explaining how to make easy-to-reuse widgets using PyQt.
8:49:56 AM    comment []

  Friday, April 02, 2004


wxPython 2.5.1.5

The 2.5.1.5 release of wxPython is now available for download.

What is wxPython?

wxPython is a GUI toolkit for the Python programming language. It allows Python programmers to create programs with a robust, highly functional graphical user interface, simply and easily. It is implemented as a Python extension module that wraps the popular wxWidgets cross platform GUI library, which is written in C++.

wxPython is a cross-platform toolkit. This means that the same program will usually run on multiple platforms without modifications. Currently supported platforms are 32-bit Microsoft Windows, most Linux or other Unix-like systems, and Macintosh OS X.

Changes in 2.5.1.5

The changes in this version are too numerous to list here, please see the following recent changes and migration guide for more details. If you are upgrading from 2.4.x then please do read the MigrationGuide fully before upgrading as there are some backwards incompatible changes.

9:16:41 AM    comment []

  Tuesday, March 30, 2004


Most Popular Python Projects

I've created a wiki page to track the most popular Python projects. In order to keep the list focused, some metrics have to be established so that every Python-related project isn't in the list. For example, a minimum of three thousand (3K) downloads per month, a few hundred subscribers to the project mailing list, or an obviously large established user base (e.g. Mailman). In addition, the list doesn't include modules or packages in the standard libraries such as Tkinter.


9:09:40 AM    comment []

  Saturday, March 27, 2004


Building a Balancing Scooter by Trevor Blackwell. Make sure you watch the video!

The first version was written in Python and used serial ports to talk to the gyroscope and motor controller.


1:18:58 PM    comment []

  Thursday, March 25, 2004


Guido on wxPython

From notes taken by Ted Leung and others at Guido's PyCon keynote this morning...

Q: wxPython
A: That's the best GUI toolkit given a number of constraints.  The only reason wxPython isn't the standard Python GUI toolkit is that tkInter was there first.  Believes wxPython is the most mature cross platform toolkit.

On a related note I recently did some simplistic research to find the most popular Python projects. The summary shows that wxPython is one of the most popular Python projects with over 20K downloads per month from SourceForge (SF) alone; SF stats are understated as of March 2004 according to SF staff. The number of subscribers to the wxPython mailing list is over 900 people, compared to 550 and 500 subscribers for PyGTK and PyQt respectively. Note that monthly downloads for wxWidgets from SourceForge are around 40 - 50K per month, so the wxPython user base is a very large part of the total wxWidgets user base.

Other Python GUI toolkits have their uses, but I just couldn't resist this opportunity to gloat. <wink>


10:52:45 AM    comment []

  Wednesday, March 24, 2004


BitTorrent

Congratulations to Bram Cohen on his Wired Rave Award for BitTorrent!

According to Wired, there are an estimated 10 million machines running BitTorrent. The SourceForge downloads alone are around 1.3 - 1.5 million per month and several of the most active Python projects on SourceForge are alternative clients for BitTorrent. That means that BitTorrent is probably the most popular program ever written in Python and one of the most popular Open Source projects as well.

[via Dave Winer]


3:42:23 PM    comment []

IronPython is Jim Hugunin's implementation of Python for .NET and Mono. Jim's IronPython paper and Ted Leung's notes on Jim's talk shed more light on this project. Jim will be doing an updated presentation on IronPython at OSCON in July.


11:39:36 AM    comment []

PyCon has started. Jeremy Hylton says there were 320 confirmed registrations as of yesterday; last year I think we only had 200 attendees. Most of the papers are now online and the remaining ones should be added before the conference is over. Ted Leung is posting notes from the sessions that he attends. The conference schedule and talk abstracts are online. The Feedster PyCon Buzz feed is a bit chaotic with a lot of duplicate posts, but it is worth checking.
9:56:54 AM    comment []

  Tuesday, March 23, 2004


HyperCard: 1987 - 2004

Well it finally happened, Apple removed the HyperCard sub-directory from the main Apple site and you can no longer buy HyperCard from the Apple store. Of course, HyperCard was never updated for Mac OS X and I'm pretty sure the last update to HyperCard was version 2.4.1 back in 1998. But the removal of the product from the Apple site is the final nail in the coffin.

If you want to upgrade your old HyperCard stacks and use an xTalk-style language, then your best bet is probably Runtime Revolution. If you want more info on HyperCard, then you might want to check out the HyperCard wiki page.

Meanwhile, the Open Source PythonCard project will continue to plug away at a worthy successor using the Python programming language that will run on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. We're finally going to make a 1.0 release later this spring and I plan to get back to work on a more integrated HyperCard-like environment for PythonCard. If you would like to help make that happen, I invite you to email me and join the project.

Rest In Peace HyperCard. You are not forgotten and your children live on...


11:22:40 AM    comment []

  Monday, March 22, 2004


Do we need a Jython JSR?

Last May I made a blog entry on Jython that covers a lot of background material, including the idea of embedding Jython in Eclipse and web servers. BEA WebLogic already supports Jython. AFAIK, nobody has added Jython support to the main JBoss distribution yet, but someone should as Jython is being used with JBoss.

After reading about JSR 241: The Groovy Programming Language last week, I had to wonder why the authors didn't just embrace Jython instead? According to one of the advisors, the developers are certainly aware of Python and Jython, because "Python is a strong inspiration for Groovy", but the developers "wanted to re-invent".

Jython is a mature production quality language running in the JVM so it has full access to the J2SE platform and J2EE. Jython programs compile to Java class files, but you can also use the Jython interpreter to interactively manipulate Java classes at runtime. Besides Java, Jython is arguably the most popular language running in the JVM. What other dynamic language running in the JVM has several books written about it?

Sean Gallagher has written two articles on why now is such an important time for a language like Python or Jython: Java, meet Python. Python, meet Java and So what about Jython? The first article also appeared in LinuxWorld.

James Strachan, one of the spec leads for JSR 241, addresses some of the concerns over the Groovy JSR.

After reading these articles and comments I doubt we need a JSR for Jython, because Jython doesn't need to be re-specified or re-implemented, but perhaps how Jython relates to Java needs better definition within the JCP? Certainly Jython could use additional developers to keep it up-to-date with the latest implementation of Python. What Jython really needs is more recognition from Sun and IBM and some resources to keep Jython development active. Those companies should also be bundling Jython with their products, providing support through code examples and articles, and evangelizing Jython to their customers.

Related links:


11:24:26 AM    comment []

  Sunday, March 21, 2004


Panther, Python, and CoreGraphics by Mitch Chapman

Mac OS X Panther includes many updated developer tools. Among them is an enhanced version of Python 2.3 with its own SWIG-based bindings to the CoreGraphics library. Here's a look at the capabilities of the module and examples of how to use CoreGraphics to rescale and decorate images for publication on the Web.


9:43:31 AM    comment []

  Saturday, March 20, 2004


PyCon Blogs

The PyCon 2004 conference starts next week (March 24-26), but the PyCon sprints started today (Saturday).

There is a Feedster PyCon Buzz feed, so you can follow bloggers at PyCon.

Unfortunately, I was unable to attend PyCon this year, so I'll see all you Pythonistas at OSCON in July.


8:05:38 AM    comment []

  Thursday, March 18, 2004


Python Scripting for C/C++ Applications

Applications can and are written in Python, but people are slow to change, so the vast majority are still done using C/C++ on Linux and Windows and a combination of C++ and Objective-C on Mac OS X. I've noticed a growing trend of using Python to provide user automation or scripting, sometimes called macros, for C/C++ applications. This makes a lot of sense:

  • developers don't have to waste time and money inventing their own scripting language and users don't have to learn a new automation language for every application they use
  • Python is an Open Source solution and can be embedded and distributed for free so there are no royalty payments or licensing hassles
  • Python is simple to learn, yet Python and its standard libraries are much more powerful than a proprietary language like VBScript
  • Python is cross-platform
  • tools like SWIG make it easy to expose part or all of the application programming interface (API)
  • Python scripting can be added to legacy projects just as well as new ones so developers don't have to abandon their old C/C++ code libraries
  • On the Windows platform, Python has an excellent interface to COM (also known as ActiveX) and can be used to interface to almost any COM program (such as the MS-Office suite). Again, Python scripting can be added to enhance a project without change to the existing COM components.
  • PyObjC can be used to add scripting to any Cocoa app on Mac OS X

For many of the same reasons, Python is often used as the "glue" language for a project. In the Java world, people are using Jython as the glue and scripting language.

I started a wiki page on python.org to help track C/C++ applications that support Python for scripting. If you know of an application that wasn't written in Python, but supports Python or Jython for scripting or as a glue language feel free to update the wiki page.


12:43:37 PM    comment []

  Tuesday, March 16, 2004


EarthClock

I wish I had written this one. When PythonCard was first getting started I wrote the worldclock sample, which fetches images from the time.gov server. EarthClock uses a similar strategy, but is so much cooler. How much cooler, well just look at this...

EarthClock supports views from different locations around the globe, weather satellite images, as well as just about any other image that you can fetch from a web site, plus it is skinnable for a variety of effects and different clock styles. I love the nighttime views with the lights from the cities.

There is a standalone Windows installer for anyone with a Windows machine, Win98 or higher, you don't need anything else. If you aren't using the standalone installer, EarthClock requires wxPython and the Python Imaging Library (PIL). If you fetch EarthClock from cvs be aware that the Clock.py file was missing as of March 16, 2004 and some of the other files are out-of-date, so I recommend just using the .zip in the file downloads section if you want the source. ShapedWindows aren't supported by wxPython on GTK yet, but they do work on Windows and the Mac.


10:41:50 AM    comment []

  Sunday, March 14, 2004


When I need to serve up a few files for friends or try out some CGIs, XML-RPC, etc. I generally just fire up the PythonCard webserver sample. However, I find the following single line at a command prompt to be quite appealing for an instant web server.

    python -c "import SimpleHTTPServer;SimpleHTTPServer.test()"

It works on any OS where you have Python installed and since you can cd (change directory) to the dir you want to serve files from before running the command you don't have to mess with config files or moving files before serving them up. If you alias the command or make a batch file you won't have to remember the whole line. Here's an example run on my Mac.

[solo:~/] altis% python -c "import SimpleHTTPServer;SimpleHTTPServer.test()"
Serving HTTP on 0.0.0.0 port 8000 ...
localhost - - [14/Mar/2004 09:27:09] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 -
localhost - - [14/Mar/2004 09:27:28] "GET /gingerbread.py HTTP/1.1" 200 -

[via insom.me.uk]

Note that this blog entry was revised after a discussion on Simon Brunning's blog.


10:03:59 AM    comment []

  Thursday, March 11, 2004


Mailman is the SourceForge Project of the Month for March 2004.

Congratulations to Barry and crew!


12:40:22 PM    comment []

  Friday, March 05, 2004


Donate to the Python Software Foundation (PSF)

A donation to the PSF would not only demonstrate your appreciation of Python, but also help to advance the development of Python and other Python-based open source tools in the future. You may like to read the PSF Mission Statement for more details.

The PSF is a non-profit organization devoted to advancing the Python programming language. The PSF is a public charity under US tax law, and all donations made by US residents are tax deductible (see the PSF donations page for details).

To donate now using PayPal, simply click here

If you have problems donating through PayPal, or prefer to donate via check then you can send your donations to:

Python Software Foundation
c/o Neal Norwitz
1707 Sinclair Lane
Crownsville, MD 21032-1925
USA

Make checks payable to the Python Software Foundation.

Thank you for your support!


11:55:28 AM    comment []

  Monday, February 09, 2004


Proposals Due Today for the Python 12 Conference at OSCON

Today, Monday, February 9th, is the final day you can submit a proposal for the Python 12 conference at OSCON 2004!

O'Reilly Open Source Convention.


8:29:36 AM    comment []

  Wednesday, February 04, 2004


The deadline for submitting a proposal to Python 12/OSCON 2004 is Monday, February 9th!

O'Reilly Open Source Convention.


1:06:56 PM    comment []

  Saturday, August 09, 2003


Mark Hammond has announced the release of version 007 of the SpamBayes Outlook Plugin.

Computerworld has published two articles on spam that highlight the effectiveness of SpamBayes.

If you use Outlook, I highly recommend you try the SpamBayes Outlook plugin and thank the team accordingly. You will be glad you did. Note that you can still use SpamBayes even if you aren't an Outlook user.


5:44:59 PM    comment []

  Thursday, August 07, 2003


Boa Constructor has been picked as the SourceForge Project of the Month [link via the Daily Python-URL]

Congratulations to Riaan Booysen and the rest of the Boa team.


10:31:35 AM    comment []

SpamBayes I Thank Thee

Every day I get over sixty SPAM messages, but thanks to SpamBayes I don't have to read any of them or even look at the subject line and sender to figure out which messages are SPAM. They are all automatically moved from of my Outlook Inbox into a SPAM folder as they arrive and after three months I am confident that SpamBayes won't mistakenly move a real message into the SPAM folder. When it isn't sure if a message is SPAM, it simply goes into another folder I've defined which is easy to scan; generally the only things that go into the "Unsure" folder are a few electronic sales receipts and HTML newsletters.

Jon Udell wrote about how SpamBayes rocks on his weblog and an InfoWorld article last May.

Now there is a way to give back to the SpamBayes project. They've set up a donations page where you can make a contribution via PayPal to the Python Software Foundation (PSF). It's like tax-deductible shareware, so give generously. 


9:51:37 AM    comment []

  Wednesday, August 06, 2003


Fredrik Lundh (the effbot) has been busy. As an update to his Python Standard Library book he has created some useful lists:

There are also some nice examples of using the new modules in Python 2.3 like: bz2, csv, and datetime.


12:08:51 PM    comment []

  Wednesday, July 30, 2003


Python 2.3

Python 2.3 is done and available for download. The quotes in the press release are great, so go check them out along with the highlights, and complete release notes. In particular, this is the beginning of Python playing a much larger role at Apple and in Mac OS X development.

"The combination of the open source Unix-based core of Mac OS X running on PowerBook G4 high-performance portables has attracted a large number of developers using open source scripting languages like Python," said Bud Tribble, Apple's vice president of Software Technology. "Python 2.3 provides greatly improved support for existing Mac OS X users, and with the upcoming release of Panther, Apple will provide Python 2.3 developers direct access to APIs for the PDF-based Quartz graphics engine and QuickTime image formats."

Congratulations to everyone involved!


8:50:40 AM    comment []

  Monday, July 21, 2003


A Conversation with Bruce Eckel

Bruce Eckel wrote the best-selling books Thinking in C++ and Thinking in Java, but for the past several years he's preferred to think in Python. Two years ago, Eckel gave a keynote address at the 9th International Python Conference entitled "Why I love Python." He presented ten reasons he loves programming in Python in "top ten list" style, starting with ten and ending with one.

In this interview, which is being published in four installments, Bill Venners asks Bruce Eckel about each of these ten points.

  • In Part I: Python and the Programmer, Bruce Eckel explains why he feels Python is "about him," how minimizing clutter improves productivity, and the relationship between backwards compatibility and programmer pain.
  • In Part II: The Zen of Python, Bruce Eckel explains why he prefers Python's valuing programmer productivity over program performance, Python's you-want-it-you-can-have-it attitude, and Python's zen-like learning curve.
  • In Part III: Type Checking and Techie Control, Bruce Eckel explains why he prefers Python's latent type checking and techie control of language evolution.
  • In Part IV: Python and the Tipping Point, Bruce Eckel talks about how Python's minimal finger typing allows programmers to focus on the task, not the tool, generating a productivity that makes more projects feasible.

10:43:46 AM    comment []